SAVANNAH DISTRICT

 

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Stay Informed, Get Involved

For those who were unable to attend our public open house, and for those who asked to the presentation slides and script, we have provided them here:

The open house was intended to help the public understand the Corps’ overall purpose for the analyses – to find and recommend the most cost-effective fish passage alternative as required by the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act of 2016. The workshop provided the public an opportunity to learn more about the proposed alternatives the Corps is studying. The Corps has studied multiple alternatives since December 2016 and their impacts on the environment and economics of the area. Reopening the spawning grounds is a mitigation requirement of the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project

Opportunities to learn more about fish passage plans at NSBLD and opportunities to provide input will be available on this web page. You can also contact the Corps of Engineers' Savannah District at 912-652-5279 or via email at  CESAS-PD.SAS@usace.army.mil.

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Below are five alternatives being considered for a fish passage at the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam.

(Click the links below to view a detailed graphic for each option.)

Retain Dam with Georgia Side Fish Passage

This alternative consists of repairing the dam gates, piers and the riverside lock wall. Additionally, a 200-foot wide fish ramp structure would be constructed through the area of the existing lock chamber and into the adjacent area of the park on the Georgia side of the river. This alternative slightly lowers the average pool elevation near the lock and dam, with impacts gradually attenuating along the river upstream. The water level at 5th St. Bridge would range between 1 to 9 inches lower than today’s conditions with average flow.

 

Fixed Weir

This alternative consists of a fixed crest weir with a rock ramp sloping upstream from the existing dam location. The lock and dam would be removed, including the foundation and the weir would be 500 feet in width.  The water level at 5th St. Bridge would range between 1.5 to 2.5 feet lower than today’s conditions with average flows.

 

Fixed Weir with Floodplain

This alternative consists of a fixed crest weir with a rock ramp sloping upstream from the existing dam location. The lock and dam would be removed. A floodplain bench approximately 275 feet in width would be excavated on the Georgia side of the existing dam location. The weir would be 500 feet in width. The water level at 5th St. Bridge would range between 8 to 13 inches lower than today’s conditions with average flow.

 

Fixed Weir with Dry Floodplain

This alternative consists of a fixed crest weir with three optional heights, and a rock ramp sloping upstream from the existing dam location.  The lock and dam would be removed. A floodplain bench approximately 250 feet wide would be excavated on the Georgia side of the river and would be grassed or paved to prevent erosion. The weir would be 500 feet in width. The water level at 5th St. Bridge would depend on the weir height: The water level with the high weir would range between 1 and 2 feet lower than today’s conditions with average flow. The average water levels for the middle and low weirs would be about 5 inches and 10 inches lower than the high weir, respectively.

 

Gated Bypass Channel

This alternative consists of a fixed weir with a rock ramp at the existing dam site with an active flood-passage structure in an excavated bypass channel through the park on the Georgia side of the river. The structure in the bypass channel consists primarily of two 50-foot gates used to pass high-flows. The lock and dam would be removed and the weir would be 500 feet in width. The water level at 5th St. Bridge would range between 5 inches to a foot lower than today’s conditions with average flow.

 

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