US Army Corps of Engineers
Savannah District Website

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Author: Russell Wicke
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  • October

    Airborne dozers put the jab in Engineers’ MOTSU knockout

    It’s new. Not the concept of dropping bulldozers from the sky. The Army has been doing that for
  • September

    Engineer Task Force revolutionizes disaster response with MOTSU recovery

    Truckers hauled the first 2,000 tons of fill material into the Military Ocean Terminal Sunny Point,
  • Airborne engineers work with Corps to put ‘blades in dirt’

    In less than two days the Corps of Engineers amassed an army of experts from five districts and one
  • Savannah Corps of Engineers leads Florence recovery on MOTSU

    The Savannah District was assigned the lead district in assessing and supporting recovery operations
  • August

    Savannah Harbor expansion boiled down: 40 miles long, 47 feet deep

    NR 17-30SAVANNAH, Ga. – It’s arguably one of the most important infrastructure projects in the
  • July

    Wetland acquisition advances SHEP progress

    The Savannah Harbor Expansion Project (SHEP) continues to make progress, most recently demonstrated by the completion of another environmental mitigation requirement. After acquiring Abercorn Island in February, the Georgia Department of Transportation recently transferred the 2,080-acre property to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
  • March

    The future of the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam

    In December, Congress passed a law which will impact the Savannah River Basin. The Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act, known as the WIIN Act, became public law Dec. 16, 2016. A specific section of this law directly affects the Savannah River just below Augusta.
  • September

    SHEP's water impoundment nearly 30% complete

    Now almost 30 percent complete, the raw-water storage impoundment dike walls are currently four feet above ground level. With a circumference of two-thirds of a mile, they will be 29 feet high, encircle 17 acres and hold 97 million gallons of water when complete.
  • April

    Reservoirs maxed out: Flood storage captures excess rainfall

    SAVANNAH, Ga. – The rain event that occurred Sunday, April 19, caused both Hartwell and Thurmond to exceed the limits of conservation storage (almost simultaneously) as water levels rose into flood storage territory. As of this writing, Hartwell’s elevation has climbed more than six inches above the conservation threshold (660.51 feet above mean sea level) and Thurmond follows close behind.
  • November

    Updates on the Savannah River Basin Comprehensive and Flood Storage studies

    In October 2013 we announced an initiative to assess our flood storage capacity to test the possibility of reducing our current flood storage allotment. More specifically, the study will provide information that will better define the present need for flood storage in the basin. In the announcement we estimated the study would take approximately 12 months. Based on recent updates from the Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), the organization conducting most of the study, the results will be delayed about six more months.