US Army Corps of Engineers
Savannah District Website

  • May

    Hydro Survey mission a key part of harbor operations

    The Brunswick and Savannah Harbors are essential to supporting the nation’s commerce. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Savannah District Hydro Survey section has responsibility for ensuring these and other waterways remain passable.
  • March

    Army to help convert vacant buildings into hospitals as COVID-19 spreads

    Army leaders announced plans to quickly convert unused buildings into makeshift hospitals in multiple states, starting in New York, as hospitals brace for medical shortages caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. This week, construction is set to kick off as the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in Manhattan will be refitted into a 1,000-bed hospital and an additional 1,800 field medical stations, officials said. Soldiers from the New York National Guard, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and civilian employees will prepare the medical facility, slated to begin operating in a week to 10 days. The race against the virus is “an unbelievably complicated problem” that needs a simple solution, said Lt. Gen. Todd T. Semonite, commanding general of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
  • Memo from the Director of Contracting re: COVID-19

    For USACE Contractors, As the Director of Contracting for the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, I wanted to personally reach out to all of you and let you know that we are actively monitoring the situation in regards to the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Attached is the guidance we received on planning for potential Novel Coronavirus Contract Impacts.
  • February

    DMCAs – Savannah’s solution for placing dredged material

    The Corps of Engineers has been dredging sediment from the Savannah River since the 19th century. A crucial requirement for maintaining a deepened harbor is having a designated placement area for sediment. The Corps calls these designated areas “dredged material containment areas” (DMCA). And since the Corps must dredge miles of the Savannah River year after year, large containment areas are required.
  • January

    Corps lakes offer Christmas trees a second chance

    Evergreen trees aren’t typically considered aquatic vegetation, but if they’re used as Christmas trees in the Savannah River Basin, chances are they’ll continue “bearing fruit” under water. Rather than have old Christmas trees go to the landfill, rangers with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoirs at Hartwell and J. Strom Thurmond lakes collect the trees in December and January each year to make fish habitats in the reservoirs.
  • Duds are preferred in FUDS

    If it goes BOOM, that's bad. If you think it might go boom, then your property might qualify for the FUDS Program. In the southeastern United States, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee, the Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) Program is overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Savannah District.
  • December

    Corps constructs new hangar for Aerial Refueling Aircraft at Seymour Johnson AFB

    Work continues on a new $59.5 million state-of-the-art maintenance hangar at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, in Goldsboro, North Carolina. The facility, under construction by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District, will support the new KC-46A Pegasus, a mid-air refueling tanker set to arrive at the installation in the summer of 2020.
  • November

    Cyber Center of Excellence update

    With more than $1.6 billion slated for construction, Fort Gordon now hosts the largest military
  • USACE – Savannah District Halloween costume contest

    It wasn't about candy. It wasn't about fright. It was all about having fun. And “it” wasn’t a clown
  • October

    USACE clinic project recognized for excellence by the Air Force

    The $48 million Seymour Johnson Air Force Base Medical Clinic, a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project, earned the 2019 United States Air Force (USAF) Design Award for facility design.
  • September

    Corps kicks off Augusta Training Wall Disposition Study

    AUGUSTA, Ga. – Geologists from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District began collecting soil samples from the bottom of the Savannah River recently as part of a disposition study to determine the cost and benefit of removing an old underwater training wall in the Savannah River.
  • August

    Aquatic plants give shelter to young fish

    Finding a quiet and safe place for a nursery tops the priorities for new parents, be they humans or
  • Identifying the presence of wetlands

    The Mission of the USACE Savannah District Regulatory Division is to protect the nation’s aquatic
  • July

    Corps to accept public comments until Sept. 12 on mining near Okefenokee

    Twin Pines Minerals is proposing to construct and operate a sand derived heavy minerals mine in
  • Three deaths, zero life jackets: personal flotation devices are No. 1 life saver on water

    Over the Independence Day weekend there were three fatalities at the Corps of Engineers supervised
  • Focus on Ecosystem Restoration

    In the late 1800s the Corps of Engineers and others cut through 46 bends in the Savannah River below
  • June

    Summer heat hits striped bass hard

    No one argues that summer heat in the South climbs well above the comfort level – for humans and
  • May

    Hurricane Season is upon us. Are you prepared?

    Successfully weathering a hurricane requires preparation at every level – governments, families and
  • Paperless 3D software now a norm for architects

    The US Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District has been going digital for about five years with
  • April

    Smile! It’s National Take our Daughters and Sons to Work Day!

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Savannah District Headquarters team hosted 30 children as part of