• November

    Corps sponsors wetlands tour for Coastal Georgia home-schoolers

    RICHMOND HILL, Ga. – Discovering frontiers outside of the classroom – or the home – can reconcile traditional learning methods and enrich the educational experience for students inundated with an array of new concepts.
  • Updates on the Savannah River Basin Comprehensive and Flood Storage studies

    In October 2013 we announced an initiative to assess our flood storage capacity to test the possibility of reducing our current flood storage allotment. More specifically, the study will provide information that will better define the present need for flood storage in the basin. In the announcement we estimated the study would take approximately 12 months. Based on recent updates from the Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC), the organization conducting most of the study, the results will be delayed about six more months.
  • Sound science is critical for balancing ecological, economic needs of the basin

    Editor’s Note: This article is authored by Oscar P. Flite III, Ph.D. CEO and Senior Scientist at Phinizy Center for Water Sciences. Dr. Flite and his organization are involved in scientific research on the Savannah River that provides critical information needed to make informed decisions about the basin’s natural resources.
  • New Fort Benning hospital set to open for business

    FORT BENNING, Ga. – Hundreds gathered for the ribbon-cutting ceremony held Nov. 7 in the atrium of the newly-constructed Martin Army Community Hospital at Fort Benning, Georgia.
  • October

    Commander: An open letter on Savannah River Basin drought management

    Since entering drought level 1 some stakeholders in the upper basin have written urging Savannah District leaders should take immediate and dramatic actions to preserve reservoir levels. Col. Thomas Tickner, the District Commander addresses these emails in this open-letter posting.
  • Freshwater storage impoundment mitigates increased chlorides in Abercorn Creek

    SAVANNAH, Ga. – Understanding the reverberating environmental impacts of the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project has been a sizable undertaking for the Corps’ and its partners. Preserving high water quality standards is at the forefront of the Corps’ efforts to minimize adverse environmental effects that may result from the expansive project.
  • Sophisticated network monitors Savannah River estuary

    SAVANNAH, Ga. – Ensuring healthy water quality is an essential part of environmental monitoring for the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project (SHEP). The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is partnering with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to monitor water quality in the estuary using a sophisticated network of continuous monitoring stations.
  • Castle Toastmasters club opens its doors to new members

    SAVANNAH, Ga. – In bold letters, a placemat with the verb “Immix,” meaning to mix in or mingle, is placed on every table at the Castle Toastmaster’s open house held Oct. 2.
  • FEST-A gears up for future deployment, seeks new talent

    SAVANNAH, Ga. – Afghanistan’s mountainous terrain spread itself out before Piper Bazemore, recently strapped into a MH-60 Blackhawk helicopter as part of an engineering mission in the region.
  • September

    Experts gather water quality data before beginning harbor deepening

    SAVANNAH, Ga. -- Scientists and technicians recently completed intensive water quality monitoring in the Savannah harbor and estuary in preparation for the upcoming deepening of the harbor and shipping channel.
  • Corps partners with Clemson University to monitor marshes for harbor deepening

    SAVANNAH, Ga. – Thanks to a partnership with Clemson University and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, scientists are collecting valuable data in the Savannah River estuary for the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project (SHEP).
  • August

    Savannah Corps lab a worldwide leader in materials testing

    MARIETTA, Ga. – On the outside, it's a modest brick building in an office park; but on the inside, the technical experts and specialized equipment make this place a global leader in materials testing.
  • Corps, South Carolina biologists track sturgeon in Savannah River

    Thanks to a partnership between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources (SC DNR), researchers are safely catching sturgeon, inserting sonic transmitters inside them, and releasing them back into the river.
  • July

    Environmental monitoring underway for Savannah harbor deepening

    With the signing of the Water Resources Reform and Development Act of 2014 earlier this year, many people expected construction of the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project (SHEP) to start immediately. However, several actions need to take place before construction can occur.
  • New Savannah bird island home to hundreds of nests this season

    To some people, a dredge disposal area might not seem very exciting—but to thousands of shorebirds it’s a safe haven, providing beneficial habitat and protected nesting sites.
  • May

    Bartering for Better Buildings: Corps aids Army Reserve upgrades through private sector development

    In a time of shrinking federal budgets for military construction, how does the Army Reserve gain new facilities to train and equip their Soldiers? One solution gaining popularity is a Real Property Exchange (RPX)—and the benefits extend far beyond the Army.
  • April

    Solar-powered school nears completion at Fort Stewart

    Construction nears completion on a $20.5 million environmentally-friendly elementary school at Fort Stewart. Built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Savannah District and prime contractor Sauer, Inc., the new Murray Elementary School is equipped with over 450 solar panels, a wind turbine, and other sustainable design features.
  • More than MILCON: Corps promotes STEM at Fort Stewart schools

    Many people associate the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers with building facilities on post; but what they may not know is that the Corps' involvement with a project doesn't stop when the building is complete.
  • March

    Corps, GDOT partnership balances environment with development

    Did you know that every roadway and bridge in the state of Georgia is linked to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers? That's because of a partnership between the Corps and the Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT)—the lead state agency for constructing road projects.
  • A lot of dam training

    What does it take to operate and maintain a dam? Technical aptitude, well-honed skills, teamwork—and a lot of dam training.