US Army Corps of Engineers
Savannah District Website

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  • February

    DMCAs – Savannah’s solution for placing dredged material

    The Corps of Engineers has been dredging sediment from the Savannah River since the 19th century. A crucial requirement for maintaining a deepened harbor is having a designated placement area for sediment. The Corps calls these designated areas “dredged material containment areas” (DMCA). And since the Corps must dredge miles of the Savannah River year after year, large containment areas are required.
  • January

    Corps lakes offer Christmas trees a second chance

    Evergreen trees aren’t typically considered aquatic vegetation, but if they’re used as Christmas trees in the Savannah River Basin, chances are they’ll continue “bearing fruit” under water. Rather than have old Christmas trees go to the landfill, rangers with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers reservoirs at Hartwell and J. Strom Thurmond lakes collect the trees in December and January each year to make fish habitats in the reservoirs.
  • Duds are preferred in FUDS

    If it goes BOOM, that's bad. If you think it might go boom, then your property might qualify for the FUDS Program. In the southeastern United States, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee, the Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) Program is overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Savannah District.
  • November

    USACE – Savannah District Halloween costume contest

    It wasn't about candy. It wasn't about fright. It was all about having fun. And “it” wasn’t a clown
  • August

    Aquatic plants give shelter to young fish

    Finding a quiet and safe place for a nursery tops the priorities for new parents, be they humans or
  • Identifying the presence of wetlands

    The Mission of the USACE Savannah District Regulatory Division is to protect the nation’s aquatic
  • July

    Corps to accept public comments until Sept. 12 on mining near Okefenokee

    Twin Pines Minerals is proposing to construct and operate a sand derived heavy minerals mine in
  • Three deaths, zero life jackets: personal flotation devices are No. 1 life saver on water

    Over the Independence Day weekend there were three fatalities at the Corps of Engineers supervised
  • Focus on Ecosystem Restoration

    In the late 1800s the Corps of Engineers and others cut through 46 bends in the Savannah River below
  • June

    Summer heat hits striped bass hard

    No one argues that summer heat in the South climbs well above the comfort level – for humans and
  • May

    Paperless 3D software now a norm for architects

    The US Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District has been going digital for about five years with
  • April

    Smile! It’s National Take our Daughters and Sons to Work Day!

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Savannah District Headquarters team hosted 30 children as part of
  • USACE employee helps to improve workplace wellness through Yoga Program

    Ten years ago when U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District Realty Specialist Emily Jimmo participated in her first yoga class, it was just for fun, but Jimmo said she soon realized the benefits of yoga.
  • 24-7, 365: Savannah Harbor Maintenance Dredging

    For 190 years the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has had the mission of maintaining the Savannah
  • December

    Vessel named in honor of former Corps boat captain Anthony Maze

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District dedicated its new hydrographic survey vessel, MAZE, on December 7, during a ceremony on the Savannah River. The vessel will be used to lead dredging operations and navigation, primarily in Savannah and Brunswick harbors and along the coast of Georgia, helping to ensure national security and international commerce for the nation. The vessel will also increase fleet flexibility, reliability and mission readiness including post –storm harbor assessments.
  • September

    Engineer Task Force revolutionizes disaster response with MOTSU recovery

    Truckers hauled the first 2,000 tons of fill material into the Military Ocean Terminal Sunny Point,
  • June

    Army civilian architect earns prestigious Savannah award

    Connolly Award” during the Society of American Military Engineers Savannah Post’s Annual Program Review at the Savannah Riverfront Marriot, June 27.
  • July

    Wetland acquisition advances SHEP progress

    The Savannah Harbor Expansion Project (SHEP) continues to make progress, most recently demonstrated by the completion of another environmental mitigation requirement. After acquiring Abercorn Island in February, the Georgia Department of Transportation recently transferred the 2,080-acre property to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
  • March

    The future of the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam

    In December, Congress passed a law which will impact the Savannah River Basin. The Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act, known as the WIIN Act, became public law Dec. 16, 2016. A specific section of this law directly affects the Savannah River just below Augusta.
  • February

    Contractors on pace to finish 5 SHEP-related features in 2017

    SAVANNAH, Ga. – To say Spencer Davis has a few irons in the fire is an understatement. As the senior project manager for the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project, or SHEP, Davis manages the multimillion-dollar project that has eight separate environmental mitigation features outside of the actual harbor and entrance channel deepening. Now more than two years in, contractors continue to push the project forward on several fronts and are expected to wrap up four contracts this year.